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#142132 - 07/10/18 04:03 AM "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!..
Az4x4 Offline
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The Mint team has published complete instructions for upgrading from Mint 18.3 to Mint 19. Just take it a step at a time and things should go well -- at least that was the plan as I set out to upgrade my test machine's OS from 18.3 to 19.

Long story short; things didn't go well. Others report that their upgrades went flawlessly, but in my case it didn't.

Went through every step, from making sure 'Timeshift' snapshots of my working 18.3 system were safely stored to completing each step of the upgrade per official instructions.

Don't think I missed anything, but when it was all said and done and I rebooted, the OS I had wasn't what I'd hoped for -- more a hybrid mashup of 18.3 and 19 than the full fledged Mint 19 I wanted, with serious issues that would have driven me nuts if I'd kept it that way.

Anyway, I rebooted to my Mint 18.3 installation media running in 'Live' mode, opened 'Timeshift', located the stored system snapshots I'd made, selected one from two days ago and restored it. Restoration went quickly, and when I rebooted Mint 18.3 was back up and running as flawlessly as ever.

No idea why the upgrade process to Mint 19 went south for me. I might have missed a step, but I don't believe so.

I'll stick with Mint 18.3 until I come up with a more bullet proof approach to upgrading, or decide to try the official approach once again. With 'Timeshift' creating daily snapshots of my working system whatever trouble I might experience will be no more a detriment than whatever it was that derailed my upgrade attempt today.

Stay tuned, more to come!..

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#142134 - 07/10/18 02:14 PM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


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George - Good honest chronicle. As you've read over the years you're now sitting in my upgrade chair. My last major upgrade was from 17.3->18.x, eventually stopping at 18.3. Mint 18.3 has run reasonably well. Unresolved issues I face now include my LCD getting squirrelly and a black screen coming off of hibernation. Both require a reboot. This happens every 1-2 months. I usually never shut off my PCs so they don't get reboots unless there are issues like the above. I'll shut them all off if a bad lightening storm is predicted.

As for backups, I'd suggest CloneZilla which will create a complete disc image to a USB drive. Like a WD My Passport. This same drive is also convenient for backing up your home directory.

As for O/S upgrades, there needs to be a compelling reason to fiddle around with them. As also mentioned, the Linux team themselves recommend not upgrading unless it's really necessary. Much of what motivates these upgrades is emotional not rational.

As for desktop Linux, it's days are numbered owing to PCs going away. It will live on severs and smart devices. Both of which will remove the hands on upgrading process from the common user. Perhaps a good thing as I can't imagine anyone wanting to dive into that pond.

The pi board and other SBCs are exceptions. Linux is a very attractive O/S for those devices as it's free. With 12M of the pi boards out there, that saves a lot of copyright and licensing fees.

For me, the Linux O/S allows me to continue running old hardware which is inexpensive and well built. The Dell Inspiron 1501 came from an era of top quality and durable hardware. Suffice to say all my Dells have good keyboards, motherboards, LCDs and hard drives. One runs in a wood shop covered with dust.


Linux/Dell runs an automatic cutoff saw stop.


Linux/Dell running a stake machine.

For me (and my customers) it's all about being cost effective and improving productivity, accuracy and reliability. The Linux O/S has been an important player in achieving these goals.

For general browsing, you can't beat the pi board running Linux Raspbian. For me I'll remain on the cutting edge of obsolete technology and enjoy the peace of mind that goes with it. Making a techy statement isn't important.

PS: The stake machine has produced over 100k stakes much faster than doing it by hand. A single person can operate it. The Dell PC and Linux are the heart of the system. That shop is filled with grinding dust.
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#142145 - 07/10/18 06:29 PM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
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Originally Posted By: Muniac
..Good honest chronicle. As you've read over the years you're now sitting in my upgrade chair. My last major upgrade was from 17.3->18.x, eventually stopping at 18.3. Mint 18.3 has run reasonably well. Unresolved issues I face now include my LCD getting squirrelly and a black screen coming off of hibernation. Both require a reboot. This happens every 1-2 months. I usually never shut off my PCs so they don't get reboots unless there are issues like the above. I'll shut them all off if a bad lightening storm is predicted..

Like you, I never shut my machines off. Instead of having them go into hibernation I simply shut their lids or turn off their external monitors and they go on running in the dark. Works for me. A couple of them have run for months on end without ever being shut down. Linux updates don't require a reboot, so that helps a lot. And I too use WD Passport external drives for keeping my home directory backups in and storing stuff I don't want to lose.

Originally Posted By: Muniac
..As for desktop Linux, it's days are numbered owing to PCs going away. It will live on severs and smart devices. Both of which will remove the hands on upgrading process from the common user. Perhaps a good thing as I can't imagine anyone wanting to dive into that pond.

The pi board and other SBCs are exceptions. Linux is a very attractive O/S for those devices as it's free. With 12M of the pi boards out there, that saves a lot of copyright and licensing fees..

The time will come when the PCs we've grown up with and enjoyed all these years will fade into memories from a distant past. However we're not there yet, even though slippage in the PC market year to year worries the big guys who've made their billions marketing PC hardware and software pipe dreams to a less and less willing public.

Little wonder that Microsoft has turned the corner and became a happy Linux advocate. They see the handwriting on the wall and know that the days of marketing their costly and inefficient Windows OS to a continually shrinking pool of buyers will one day come to an end -- much like the end their Windows Phone OS came to. Linux is their fall back position, but what they add to the Linux community or take from in in the years to come is anyone's guess at this point.

Originally Posted By: Muniac
..the Linux O/S allows me to continue running old hardware which is inexpensive and well built. The Dell Inspiron 1501 came from an era of top quality and durable hardware. Suffice to say all my Dells have good keyboards, motherboards, LCDs and hard drives. One runs in a wood shop covered with dust..

Those early Dell Inspirons were bears for wear, tough as nails machines that take to Linux like ducks to water. Dell continues to produce and market some of the best machines available with Linux preloaded. I'm running one, a Dell XPS 13 i7 developers edition Linux Mint powered laptop in our travel trailer, using it to drive our flat screen TV and surf the web while we're away from home.

Originally Posted By: Muniac
...For me I'll remain on the cutting edge of obsolete technology and enjoy the peace of mind that goes with it. Making a techy statement isn't important..

I'm in much the same boat. Every machine I run has quite a few years of use behind it, most of them struggling with various iterations of MS Windows. People get discouraged after some time and sell these machines for pennies on the dollar, something I sometimes take advantage of when the opportunity arises and the machine is right for the job.

I very much enjoy testing various Linux distros on my little ASUS Zenbook, but making "a techy statement" of any sort is something I'm not at all interested in.
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#142146 - 07/10/18 07:32 PM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


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I try to avoid the lid ups/downs. Puts wear on the hinges and flexes the ribbon cables in there. I clam it up only when I need to take one with me somewhere. Or store it on the shelf. Dell made really good PC stuff. Don't know where they're at now. As for motherboards, ASUS was the defacto standard with a Phoenix BIOS. All changed now as processors have become extremely complex.

You can score good deals on used PCs if you know how to give them a new life. And which one(s) to purchase. A Linux O/S is a BIG help in that regard.

Blow a little dough on a Raspberry pi 3 model B board. You'll love it!

As for PCs, they will always remain. Many applications require a standard sized keyboard and display. CAD, video editing, graphics, etc. come to mind. Not to mention software development. All this hardware has its place. I think choices will remain for a while yet. BIG PC markets not so.

Some people in a work setting really need to follow the crowd and company policies. Smart phones offer many productivity perks. Staying competitive requires a concession. Luckily I'm not involved with the "in crowd". My customers are interested in the baby not labor pains. It's all about when can I get it and how much will it cost! Making it all work is assumed. If you can't handle that, customers will just find someone else than can deliver.
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#142161 - 07/13/18 07:40 PM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
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Registered: 08/18/08
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Originally Posted By: Muniac
..Blow a little dough on a Raspberry pi 3 model B board. You'll love it!

As for PCs, they will always remain. Many applications require a standard sized keyboard and display. CAD, video editing, graphics, etc. come to mind. Not to mention software development. All this hardware has its place. I think choices will remain for a while yet. BIG PC markets not so...

If I had a task the Raspberry board could do better than what's done now I'd give it a go. May come up with something as time goes by, but for now the inexpensive second and third hand laptops I run do the job. They're a complete package. Setting them up with Linux is easy, and once Windows is no more they handle whatever I ask of them without complaint. Can't beat that with a stick!..

The only thing that's continuing to shrink consumer PC wise, as you've noted, are the BIG PC markets. Been that way for some years now, and will be ever more that way as people move en masse to small hand held and wearable devices, most of them powered by custom coded Linux based open source OSs..

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#142162 - 07/13/18 08:04 PM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


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I too use old PC hardware. The Raspberry pi boards go into automation projects. But the damn boards are so powerful I've adopted one for my desktop computer. What's nice is the LARGE HMDI monitor the pi supports. My old Dells can't run anything HDMI. New "older" PCs probably have added an HDMI port. In which case you've got those bases covered. Happy computing.
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#142163 - 07/14/18 12:39 AM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Az4x4]
peejman Offline
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If/when I ever dive off the Linux bridge, a raspberry pi is how I expect to do it. They're amazingly powerful and versatile.
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#142166 - 07/14/18 02:13 PM Re: "Timeshift" in Linux Mint - a real lifesaver!.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


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pj - You're on board with the concept. When you're ready check out CanaKit for products. Amazon Prime is another good option for CanaKit. Remember to get 2 MicroSD cards and a USB adapter for them. I like Lexar products. 32Gb is usually plenty of storage. A WD My Passport USB drive of 2Tb is also nice to have. Optional, however.

I use the Logitech K330 USB keyboard + mouse combo. Works nice! NoMachine is great networking software should you need to run headless or from a remote desktop. Supports Linux, ARM7, Windows and MAC.
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