Search

GREAT RIDES & STAYS!
Fab Ads
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#140742 - 02/17/18 07:49 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4097
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Muniac
..I wasn't correlating open source with no jobs. Open source is alive and well and I'm very glad for it. Also hats off to those writing code and sharing the details with the world. One size doesn't fit all, however. I like options and diverse ones too..

You're right not to "correlate open source with no jobs." Open source clearly doesn't doesn't mean that commercial models aren't available for people to work within.

At the beginning, 20 years ago when "open source" first hit the ground running, many developers contributed their own time, talents and resources to help the dream take shape. In time though the world of open source needed more than a world wide cadre of dedicated hobbyists to achieve greatness. The business community at large saw this as an opportunity and came willingly onboard.

Today the great majority of OSS contributions are provided by software engineers working for commercial organizations. Their companies are those whose business depends on the open source projects their employees contribute to. Commercial enterprises increasingly release well engineered in-house developed solutions to the open source community at large as a way of recognizing their employees and supporting the wider community.

Open source has solidly forged its place as the default for new software companies. In terms of technologies employed to build and support the staggeringly huge marketplace of new products constantly being introduced, as well as powering these innovative products themselves, open source technologies rule the day. OSS thrives when it's used and maintained, and great products flourish, often at exponential rates, driven by adoption and OSS evolution.

The way most software today is created is 180 degrees opposite from what it was in the past -- thanks to the open source software movement. Software developers share and work together more efficiently and effectively within the framework, ethical practices, licenses, and community support that OSS provides.

Open source software is now a global community of colleagues and friends. People from countries all around the world collaborate on open source projects, striving to make the world a better, more equitable place for all.

At the very center of technological innovation open source software is the engine and driving force, and it continues to expand its reach and influence exponentially.

As the speed of software development increases, the size and scope of open source projects keeps pace. The products and services that are developed have impact globally. Open source is the one viable method for global businesses to rein in development costs, outpace their competition, and flourish at every level within their fields of endeavor.

Open source establishes expectations among developers that the software they create and work with is and should be, by default, open. Developers expect to fork and modify most everything they work with. They're surprised and suspicious if they find they can't. If a useful package is closed source, you can bet an open source alternative is being developed to replace it.

Many open source projects are the very best solutions in their particular use case, to a point where there are virtually no closed source tools that have managed to gain meaningful traction in today's marketplace. For instance TensorFlow, Apache Solr, Kubernetes and OpenStack. These and other open source tools have far more market share than any closed source option that may be available.

Open source technologies have changed the world. It doesn't matter what industry you're involved with, or how large an organization you work for. For instance, open source driven 3D printing impacts housing, manufacturing and even healthcare. Data processing software, analytics and machine learning impacts retailers, government, military and media. Mobile technologies impact banking, retail and other mission critical industries world wide.

The open source community has grown and is growing exponentially. Today there are literally millions of OSS projects on repositories such as Github, fostering innovation and collaboration crucial to the growth of the OSS community and the betterment of the world we share with one another.
_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140746 - 02/18/18 04:52 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5530
Loc: Montrose, CO
The amount of software and information out on the internet is staggering. It challenges us on learning new skills to search for it. Very different than the old fashioned library, Dewey decimal system and the reference library. Github is good and I've downloaded many source code files from it.

As mentioned, tools and design blocks are much better than years ago. Costs have come way down too. The old Seagate ST-225 20Mb hard drives were about $250 back in the 80s. Now you can buy a 2Tb USB drive for $90. Just plug it in and go. Amazing!
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
#140853 - 02/28/18 10:25 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4097
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Muniac
..The amount of software and information out on the internet is staggering. It challenges us on learning new skills to search for it... Github is good and I've downloaded many source code files from it..

A decade goes by in a hurry, something you realize ever more acutely as the years creep up on you.

Back in 2007 open source software was barely half as old as it is today. I paid attention as things took place in the open source world these past ten years, but it’s difficult to remember everything. So looking back through articles and posts from that time helps as I recall a world of open source software that’s very different from today -- a world that, for a time, we weren't sure would even survive, much less thrive.

The single biggest change from ten years ago to the present? ..Microsoft.

A decade ago Microsoft was the 900 lb gorilla in the room, dominating the computing world like no other company on earth. Microsoft’s bosses were astute enough even then that they correctly viewed open source software as their most serious long term threat. So they initiated a plan of attack to weaken and hopefully destroy open source before it gained unstoppable momentum.

Microsoft’s strategy boiled down to spreading (FUD) Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt about free open source software at every level. Seizing every possible opportunity it questioned, criticized and attacked the capability and viability of open source and the projects that software freedom spawned.

Microsoft did its best (and worst) to convince the world that free open source software wasn’t needed. For quite some time the final outcome of their unrelenting corporate hostility and the pressure it brought to bear on open source was seriously in question.

Along with its mud slinging campaign, Microsoft sought to undermine and diminish open source by filing hundreds of patent infringement claims across the entire software ecosystem through their powerfully staffed legal department. The company claimed that the Linux kernel, open source graphical user interfaces, the OpenOffice productivity suite and a wide variety of popular free software projects massively violated obscure company patents.

Their strategy was to put fear of high powered litigation into open source users, thereby squeezing unwarranted licensing fees from companies that used open source software -- all the while painting open source projects as little more than bare imitations of Microsoft's own supposedly original brilliant ideas. This took place irrespective of the fact the Microsoft had, from the start, been one of the biggest violators and usurpers of software code not its own the world had ever seen.

The patent battle Microsoft's powerful legal team waged against open source drug on for years. Even though it generated a certain amount of revenue for the company, in the end it failed miserably to discredit open source software or slow its ever accelerating development.

At much the same time Microsoft waged yet another underhanded campaign against open source software, this over the approval of its own ‘Office Open XML’ format, a name selected because it was disingenuously similar to ‘OpenOffice XML,’ the popular open source alternative to Microsoft’s closed source OOXML format.

Microsoft’s OOXML was approved by the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and is the dominant format for word processing and spreadsheet files to the present day. OpenOffice XML, later renamed OpenDocument Format (ODF), was likewise accepted as an internationally recognized open standard format, and continues in that role to vex Microsoft.

Microsoft may have felt it somehow ‘won’ that particular battle, but in the end it lost the war it started with open source. While still profitable in the shrinking PC market, Microsoft today is essentially irrelevant in the most dynamic, fastest growing markets -- smartphones, supercomputers, the Internet of Things, servers, online search, AI, driverless vehicles, social media, etc., etc. -- all of which operate almost exclusively on open source Linux code.

Having watched as these things took place, wondering at the time if open source would survive the ‘blitzkrieg’ attacks Microsoft threw at it, it’s fascinating to look back on where open source was a decade ago, the battles it fought and the war it won to get to the powerhouse position it occupies today, and marvel at what open source technologies have yet to offer as the future rushes towards us..

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140856 - 03/01/18 03:59 AM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5530
Loc: Montrose, CO
Such has been going on for years if/when corporate money feels threatened. It's part of our free market behaves. Not always complimentary. But good technology will find its way of surviving.

RCA had a similar situation when Major Edwin Armstrong developed FM broadcasting in 1933. FM being viewed as a threat to be removed from the market. It didn't work.
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
#140857 - 03/01/18 04:13 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4097
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Muniac
.....It seems to me an "open source" encryption algorithm wouldn't make much sense..

The question, as I understand it, seems to be that if a cryptographic algorithm is open source doesn't that mean that anyone with access to the code should be able to crack it? Even through open source algorithms abound these day, how does being 'open source' keep them from being cracked?

Everything I've read tells me that 20th century encryption systems relied for the most part on 'obscurity,' their secrets or 'code' locked away in some 'closed source' vault to keep them from prying eyes.

In the long run, as the digital age swept over us, this proved untenable. The algorithm itself had to be kept top secret, something technically impossible if the program it protected was to be distributed. Once someone snagged a copy, uncovered the algorithm and 'cracked' it, the whole program had to be rewritten and the process begun again -- a terribly unwieldy approach.

In our present century the only 'secret' in encryption is your password. Even today's closed source commercial programs use locking algorithms that are publicly accessible.

The true strength of any encryption algorithm is not in obscurity, but in its ability to protect your data by using only your password.

Bruce Schneier, master cryptographer, explains:

"Every secret creates a potential failure point. Secrecy, in other words, is a prime cause of brittleness -- something likely to make a system prone to catastrophic collapse. Conversely, openness provides ductility." (Ductility: the ability of a solid material to be subjected to great tensile stress and stretched thin as a wire without breaking)..

As a result, open source encryption, depending only on the strength of the password being used, is acknowledged as a fundamentally more secure approach than encryption by obscurity.

Ultimately though, there's no 'uncrackable' password, just as there's no absolute way to so thoroughly 'obscure' an algorithm as to render it effectively 'uncrackable'.

True security in today's digital world has many facets to it, none of which should be overlooked.

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140861 - 03/01/18 10:57 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4097
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Az4x4
.....still profitable in the shrinking PC market, Microsoft today is essentially irrelevant in the most dynamic markets...

As a followup, the market analyst firm IDC reports that PC shipments dipped below 100 million units in 2017, and says there's worse to come for the PC market.

New PC and tablet shipments in 2017 suffered a 2.7% decline from the previous year. PC sales to business was a somewhat positive figure but tempered by lack of demand for legacy devices and component shortages in critical areas.

Notebook sales were stronger than they'd been since 2012. However PC sales overall for last year weren't encouraging, and the long term downward trend of the PC market showed no signs of slowing.

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140867 - 03/02/18 04:40 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5530
Loc: Montrose, CO
Mentioned this several years ago with PCs. No surprises as newer more versatile devices replace PCs. PCs are now more of a specialty market and workstation oriented. It's all part of how tech trendy products come, get replaced and go.

One day they'll tape a sensor to your head and we can all think our way through life. Glad I won't be around for it.
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
#140895 - 03/05/18 07:44 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4097
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Ten years ago Firefox was a prominent open-source success story. Tackling Microsoft's bloated Internet Explorer, Firefox won that early browser war, and it looked like Mozilla would go on building on the success of Firefox.

Mozilla is still doing well financially. But it's success in Web browsers has slipped dramatically. Firefox usage peaked in 2010, and its market share has declined ever since. Firefox today is seen as a niche browser used mainly by long time die-hard supporters. Among other missteps, Mozilla's vocal support for integrating DRM into the fabric of the web lost it a great many friends and a lot of good will. But Firefox's fall from the top was caused by the rise of Google's Chrome browser more than anything else.

When Chrome was released in September 2008, few people imagined it would come to dominate the browser market. Today Google's virtual monopoly in browser land seems to some like a rerun of Microsoft's Internet Explorer days, with services and sites optimized for Chrome, often to the detriment of other browser platforms.

Little wonder that other browsers adopt Chrome's underlying open-source Chromium features and technology in wholesale fashion these days. To do otherwise would likely signal the end of that browser's run.
_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140905 - 03/06/18 04:55 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4097
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

For a fascinating, instructive, funny read outlining the history of web browser development and the 'Browser Wars' that created everything we have today, Click HERE!

..Go on, click the link, you'll enjoy it -- I promise!!..
_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140906 - 03/06/18 04:55 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Offline


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5530
Loc: Montrose, CO
I've had issues with FF after upgrades. Stupid annoying things that did work with the older version but didn't work after the upgrade. It isn't supposed to work that way. Last one was youtube videos wouldn't play. I had to dicker around and finally turn off a bunch of stuff. Also FF is constantly screwing around with its controls. Causing an unnecessary learning curve with new versions. Then there is the search engine options mix up.

I did load Chrome on one of my Dells. It seems to run fine. I have it on the pi board too. As for IE, that went into the junk pile many years ago.

The underlying HTML code these browsers process is also a mess. Riddled with bugs and browser version sensitive code. Years and years of band aid improvements rather than a proper design from the inception (like the Linux kernel). But no one could foresee what was to come. Now so much of the industry is invested in this path it's hard to deviate. Also the backwards compatibility devil needs its dues.

I'd reason that one day PCs won't be able to connect to the internet at all. Mobile devices will displace them entirely. For extra cost you'll buy a big screen and keyboard.
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2

Web & Site Search
Google
 
Custom TO Customer
Specialty Resource
Fab Ads
Boardcaster Updates

Board Upgrade: Board upgrade to V7.5.8 has been completed on Tuesday Sept 2nd 2014. This should solve the missing posts problem. Enjoy the new software!

Who's Online
0 registered (), 43 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Shout Box

Top Posters
Reggie 11629
alexd 5915
Muniac 5530
Moto Psycho 4684
Az4x4 4097
peejman 2981
kris 2365
Doc250 1643
Paul49 1623
JerryH 1508
Forum Stats
5194 Members
38 Forums
15622 Topics
140238 Posts

Max Online: 149 @ 11/09/12 11:04 PM
Newest Members
whit, greyapron, Radke, Temeku, allan55
5194 Registered Users
December
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31