Search

GREAT RIDES & STAYS!
Fab Ads
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#140683 - 02/13/18 05:52 PM My take on today's OS options..
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4049
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

I've run a lot of operating systems these past three decades, from the oldest MacOSs to the earliest Windows versions, on through XP, 7 and finally 10. And these past 12 years I've run more Linux distros than you could begin to count. As a poor-man's version of a power-user I've long since found the latest versions of Linux Mint to be, unabashedly, simply the best of the best when it comes to desktop OSs.

Why is that so?

Starting with the basics, MacOS, in its modern iterations, has the worst bug ever in any OS -- the macOS High Sierra 'security hole' that lets anyone gain full administrative control.

Windows, from ancient to modern times, continues having security issues pop up month after month, almost like clockwork.

Linux also has security problems. But ask yourself how many of these Linux bugs that occasionally appear have had serious impact on the desktop? You're truly up to speed if you answer "none."

Since moving to Linux Mint as my desktop of choice in 2006 I've never had need of an anti-virus program. For all practical purposes viruses, like we see and have to deal with in Windows, don't impact Linux at all. If you've kept even marginally up to date you've read that Linux exploits do exist. And they do. But you have to consciously work to infect your Linux operating system to be affected by them -- basically because you must, as 'root,' personally open the doors these exploits need to gain access to your Linux OS.

Then there's ease of use to consider. Despite long standing oft repeated ill founded FUD, top tier Linux desktops, including the newest Linux Mint 18.3, are incredibly simple to install and easy to use right from the get go. Mint's Mate' and Cinnamon interfaces use a classic "Windows, Icons, Menu, and Pointer" (WIMP) interface. If you've used the classic Windows XP user interface (judged by many to be the best ever Windows menu) you'll be completely at home with Linux Mint!

So, how hard is it really to install some application you'd like to run in Linux Mint? Desktop users simply open Mint's Software Manager, search for and locate the app they want, point, click, and it's installed! Not difficult at all!

Want to update your system to a newer version of the OS you use? With Macs and Windows that can take hours. With Linux Mint it took me less than an hour to update to the latest version of the OS, most of which was waiting for the download process to complete.

With Windows, as a Windows using friend pointed out not long ago, just updating a mouse driver took almost 10 minutes, and transitioning his system from Windows 7 (or 8.1) to Windows 10, start to finish, was a marathon affair lasting into the wee hours of the morning of day two for him.

Linux Mint is fast even on older hardware. MacOS is generally seen as slow as molasses on a cold winter day on what most see as somewhat affordable Apple hardware.

Windows 10 Pro, set up to dual boot on my Dell XPS 13 with a Intel i7-5500U Broadwell processor and 8Gbs of memory, runs just fast enough to be useful, but truly 'fast' isn't how I'd describe its overall performance. Linux Mint 18.3 on the other hand, dual booting on the same Dell XPS 13, runs like a champ! I wouldn't waste my time or anyone else's trying to run Windows or macOS on an older computer for common daily computing needs.

Whatever you run, OS wise, you're doubtless aware of the pros and cons, the limitations and drawbacks to such a system. In my case, needing Windows 10 in place to run high end Adobe graphics programs that don't run natively in Linux Mint saw me recently set up a Win 10 / Linux Mint 18.3 dual boot system on my Dell XPS 13 laptop -- which is, at this point, my best option given that I have old line customers coming back who want me to do graphics work for them again. Additionally this provides me with a first hand comparison of how well these two operating systems function, and what it takes to get the best out of each of them -- some of which I've sought to pass along here.

Enjoy your day!
_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140684 - 02/13/18 06:02 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Qwazert Offline
Member L2
*****

Registered: 09/01/15
Posts: 247
Loc: BC Canada
I enjoy running various distro's (started back in the early 00's) but I wouldn't get too cocky about the "virus" situation. Like they say...why create virus for 5% of the market share?
When (notice I said "when" and not "if"?) Linux becomes more mainstream...you can bet that its share of problems will increase as well. Granted it IS more difficult to infiltrate, and you can see the various Windows versions evolving over time to adopt some Linux permissions, but it can be done.

However, I'm sure that as "issues" come up, the Linux community will be a bit more proactive than the MS crowd.
_________________________
http://dr650rider.blogspot.ca/

Top
#140690 - 02/13/18 08:14 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Qwazert]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4049
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Qwazert
.....I'm sure that as "issues" come up, the Linux community will be a bit more proactive than the MS crowd..

That's true because the world wide "Linux community" is the driving force behind Linux on the desktop. On the other hand the "MS crowd" is all too often simply the tag along tail that MS, the super secretive 'big dog,' wags at will..

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140699 - 02/14/18 03:46 AM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Online   content


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5315
Loc: Montrose, CO
Linux is supported by a community of people interested in promoting the O/S. It's both good and bad. Quality varies widely from very knowledgeable to inaccurate. Support is very scattered and mostly internet/blob based. Answers can be found if one digs and exercises patience. It takes time to get answers and given no money is exchanged there is no "contract" of terms. Books on the subject are available too but quickly go out of date. As Linux is literally changing by the hour.

Windows is supported by a "for profit" corporate business entity. Very different flavor. These are choices we can make. Both have their place. It other words, there is an ass for every seat. Pick what fits best.
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
#140704 - 02/14/18 10:09 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4049
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Muniac
..Linux is supported by a community of people interested in promoting the O/S. It's both good and bad. Quality varies widely from very knowledgeable to inaccurate..

True enough as far as it goes.

The main difference between Linux based and other operating systems is that the Linux kernel, along with the thousands of other parts that go to make up a Linux 'distro,' are 'free and open-source' software. Linux based OSs are developed to be compatible with other operating systems including adherence to recognized computing standards.

Linux based software projects, although developed in a collaborative manner, are most often produced independently of one another. Open source software licenses explicitly permit redistribution, which allows Linux distro projects to select the best available software produced by these stand-alone projects, making it available in the Linux desktop or server OS they offer to the public.

Most top-tier Linux distros maintain huge online collections of system and application software available for their users to download and install by way of a network connection, for example Linux Mint's 'Software Manager' and the online software repositories it draws from. This provides users with the means to easily adapt their Linux OS to their own specific needs without worrying where the software they're using originates --something Windows users must constantly be wary of.

Linux kernel based operating systems are maintained in a variety of ways; by individuals, by specialized development teams, by community based volunteers, and by commercial enterprises of all sorts.

A Linux distribution's 'development team,' typically consisting of talented Linux programmers and software engineers, sets the default configuration of the Linux kernel their distro uses, establishes system security parameters, and oversees the integration of the various software packages their distro offers users. Typically they'll use a major 'package manager' application to install, remove, and update each part of their system's software, all from one central well vetted location.

Windows users, at least in the past, were more or less in a customer/supplier relationship. They payed (sometimes 'through the nose') for the software they used, paid for warranties and support, and they expected the software they'd purchased to come with a certain level of usability.

They felt they had 'rights' with the software they had paid for, irrespective of the fine print in the EULA's they clicked 'OK' to. They paid for technical support and imagined they had every right to receive it on demand. They grew used to dealing with corporate entities rather than real people. Their contracts were with the company, through 'official channels,' not with a some person somewhere. At least that's how it used to be with Windows -- but not so much anymore. Now the rules of the game have changed. The introduction of Windows 10 and the 'Windows as a Service' model that MS is actively promoting have made those who use Windows essentially one of the nameless faceless 'cash cows' the company markets to.

Desktop Linux users, whether they initially realize it or not, are by definition part of the worldwide Linux community. They don't typically pay for the software they download and use. They don't normally buy technical support. They download free open source software, install it on machines new and old they already have, and use online forums to find whatever help they may need. They deal with real people who also use Linux and are interested in the same things they are -- not with for profit corporations that see them as part of a massive nameless, faceless herd of users.

Many of yesterday's most strident Linux critics, including Microsoft itself, have changed their tune in recent years. Linux's user support model, consisting of community-based online support, has tremendously improved from where it was when it started. Originating with a huge online community, linked by the top search engines and replete with dedicated websites, Linux's online support is now rated second to none by those truly in the know. If someone finds they have such a need paid support contracts are available from top tier Linux providers, Red Hat Linux and Canonical's Ubuntu for example.

Generally speaking, most Linux problems have long since been dealt with. Solutions are well documented and readily available. Chances are excellent you'll find the solution you're looking for fairly quickly if you cosy up to Google Search and stay with it for a while. Actually this approach is a lot quicker than trying to deal with some impersonal corporate entity that doesn't really care whether you individually sink or swim.

The online Linux community is a genuine asset in every sense of the word, just as our community here on XT225.com is similarly a real asset to XT owners and riders.

Experienced Linux users and skilled developers really are 'out there,' monitoring web forums, mailing lists and IRC channels, helping users find their way past Linux issues quickly and safely.

There's dozens upon dozens of Linux forums and specialized sites where welcoming people gladly answer questions and walk users through problems -- very much like we enjoy here with our XTs on XT225.com, only many times over!

If you're at all interested, like millions upon multiple millions of us are, don't let naysayers and critics poison what otherwise can be a most positive experience before you even get started!

It was once commonly said that "desktop Linux is one of the best kept open secrets in computing!" With the increasing proliferation of desktop Linux world wide we don't hear that anymore!..

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140705 - 02/15/18 04:12 AM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Online   content


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5315
Loc: Montrose, CO
Yes I see more commercial software vendors providing Linux offerings. Most make the money on hardware such as specialty boards, conversion cables, etc. It's in their interest to support as many platforms as possible. More customers.

As for open source, download the Linux kernel source sometime and have a look. The Raspberry pi source is 64,483 files! Try to compile it and then get help with issues.

Yes there are a lot of people knowledgeable and this number greatly diminishes, as you go down deeper into the kernel. True experts at this level are hard to connect with.

POSIX is the standard you are referring to. It's evolving in the right direction with a long way to go. PCs are a dead technology now. Used only by specialized applications.

I just spent 16 hours on flushing out an RS485 comm problem with porting some software from Linux (Dell) to Linux (Raspberry pi). If the POSIX standard was complete this would have been a 5 minute job. It ain't that way in the real world.

I'm glad Linux is out there as it provides the tool chains I need for development. gcc and Geany being two I use often. As for support, how do those folks plan on earning a living? Microsoft and Apple employ HUGE numbers of people. This has value too.
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
#140706 - 02/15/18 08:07 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Muniac]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4049
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Muniac
.....As for (Linux) support, how do those folks plan on earning a living? Microsoft and Apple employ HUGE numbers of people. This has value too..

One of the myths about open source software is that open source and profit are mutually exclusive. People who've grown up thinking in terms of 'profit and loss' in a consumer marketplace have a difficult time wrapping their heads around the idea that for every single employee 'closed source' outfits like MS and Apple have working for them, there's countless other highly qualified and eminently skilled software engineers and developers world wide who make their living working in the 'open source' world.

Huge numbers of OSS developers and the projects they work on generate real revenue. Some bring in just enough to survive while others make so much they put proprietary alternatives to shame. An OSS developer requires a paradigm shift in thinking in order to profit from his work. Instead of the software he or she develops being the product itself, seeing their software as the platform that paves the way for other revenue streams is what's been proven to work over the course of many years.

The most common method of generating income within an OSS framework is to provide a needed service alongside the software itself. Look carefully at any OSS project and they more than likely will utilize such a 'value added in the form of service or support' method in one way or another.

There's far too many examples of how skilled OSS developers find ways of attaching revenue streams to the software they provide to detail these sufficiently here.

If there truly were no way to earn a living from OSS development most of these would have long ago gone back to whatever they did before they got involved with open source.

The huge, rapidly expanding world of open source software development is filled with opportunities that skilled people world wide are taking advantage of in an endless variety of ways.

It's kinda like the wild west in some ways, with horizons that stretch endlessly out front and possibilities on every hand that know no bounds -- just waiting for the right people with the right ideas to turn a new OSS project into gold. Like the wild west there's difficulties to be overcome, issues that vex, and dreams that do come true. Life on this rapidly expanding frontier is nothing like punching a time clock for one of the 'big guys'!

Not saying it's easy work. Obviously it's not. Just saying it's a huge, rowdy, free for all 'work in progress' that's grabbed the attention of the entire world, and it'll only get bigger and more dominating as time goes by..

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
#140709 - 02/15/18 11:37 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Selden Offline
Member L3
*****

Registered: 03/25/16
Posts: 314
Loc: GA
The Cathedral and the Bazaar is the definite work on this question. The open software model is alive and well.

I agree with Az4x4 that OS X is anything but fast on my desktop iMac (which has 6 Gb of RAM). After 7 years of using Chromebooks, using anything else feels like swimming through molasses. On the desktop, in numbers of users, Chrome OS is by far the most successful Linux distro to date, even though it's not listed as such because it's not open, and is locked down tightly for security.
_________________________
Don't fix it if it ain't broke, don't break it if you can't fix it.

Top
#140720 - 02/16/18 04:30 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Az4x4]
Muniac Online   content


Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 5315
Loc: Montrose, CO
I wasn't correlating open source with no jobs. Open source is alive and well and I'm very glad for it. Also hats off to those writing code and sharing the details with the world. One size doesn't fit all, however. I like options and diverse ones too. Linux, Windows, Mac, etc. provide them and some healthy competition which makes all of them a better product.

Companies that lock down their source code aren't the enemies of users. Businesses that invest in R&D have a right to recover those costs and protect their investments. I also think the most success with Linux will come from a company(s) that interfaces it properly to a user group. Chrome O/S as an example, perhaps. Few of us users will ever dive down into source code, compiles and builds.

Now a days, security is of paramount importance. Companies will (and should) do whatever it takes to provide secure software tools. If that means no source code, I'm fine with that. It seems to me an "open source" encryption algorithm wouldn't make much sense.

And there is no doubt that Linux (from UNIX) was developed by some very smart folks. It is, indeed, a superior O/S light years ahead of anything that was out there back in the day. DOS doesn't even belong in the same room. Only a fool would argue the talent pool Bell Labs maintained. It was about 45 minutes from home and I knew a few folks that worked there. Very smart/talented people! Gave us the transistor too.
_________________________
Evolve & Simplify
Be There or Be Nowhere! A Few Adventures & Video

Top
#140721 - 02/16/18 04:30 PM Re: My take on today's OS options.. [Re: Selden]
Az4x4 Offline
Platinum Member
*****

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 4049
Loc: Heber/Overgaard, AZ

Originally Posted By: Selden
..The Cathedral and the Bazaar is the definite work on this question. The open software model is alive and well.

I agree with Az4x4 that OS X is anything but fast on my desktop iMac (which has 6 Gb of RAM). After 7 years of using Chromebooks, using anything else feels like swimming through molasses. On the desktop, in numbers of users, Chrome OS is by far the most successful Linux distro to date, even though it's not listed as such because it's not open, and is locked down tightly for security..

Having never previously read 'The Cathedral and the Bazaar' I was amazed at how attuned my own views are to Raymond's clear eyed detailing of the open source software model's dynamics, and what it means for software engineering from here on.

Anyone who has carefully observed whats been going on this past quarter of a century, since Linus posted his 'little project' in the online 'Bazaar' of ideas, inviting those interested to participate in it's development, could not, it seems to me, help but come to similar conclusions.

Linux based Chrome OS, along with Linux based Android, if and when listed as such -- difficult as it may be for some to accept, pushes the world wide total of everyday Linux users completely out of the reach of anything the 'Cathedral' markets to its users.

And this is only the start, still the early days of the OSS 'revolution'!..

_________________________
Lovin' life here in Arizona's cool Mogollon Rim Country!!

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Web & Site Search
Google
 
Custom TO Customer
Specialty Resource
Fab Ads
Boardcaster Updates

Board Upgrade: Board upgrade to V7.5.8 has been completed on Tuesday Sept 2nd 2014. This should solve the missing posts problem. Enjoy the new software!

Who's Online
0 registered (), 47 Guests and 2 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Shout Box

Top Posters
Reggie 11534
alexd 5915
Muniac 5315
Moto Psycho 4684
Az4x4 4049
peejman 2733
kris 2365
Doc250 1643
Paul49 1551
JerryH 1508
Forum Stats
5083 Members
38 Forums
15355 Topics
138230 Posts

Max Online: 149 @ 11/09/12 11:04 PM
Newest Members
stevef534, captkirk, slothrides, Johncuthill, Banjo
5083 Registered Users
May
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31