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DMO Specialties

Posted By: Kenny4

DMO Specialties - 07/04/20 01:00 AM

I went ahead and ordered the over sized pegs from the site sponsor. Almost $80 but I'll be standing up a lot and want to feel secure about the pegs under me. I installed them today with no hassles.

Many of you have these on your bike and I'm curious what you do with the shortened and more cramped distance to the shift lever. If you loosen the shift lever, is it adjustable up and down. Thanks

Kenny4
Posted By: ppilotmike

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/04/20 10:20 AM

This is a great question, and the reason I have not gotten a set for my bike. I will be watching with interest as to how others have dealt with this.
Posted By: nobade

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/04/20 01:48 PM

I haven't noticed it made any difference on my bike. No clearance issues at all.
Posted By: Muniac

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/04/20 03:02 PM

No problems here either. You can adjust the shift level up/down with the barrel nut. Access to the shift level is also influenced by footwear. As for the wide pegs, I regard them as a safety perk. If you're trail riding and standing on the pegs, improved grab between pegs and sole is important. On the small OEM pegs I've had my foot slip off which isn't good. The small pegs also create a pressure point on the bottom of your foot which gets uncomfortable. Ride safely.
Posted By: Kenny4

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/05/20 12:10 AM

Thanks Muniac. Question---in the picture in the oem parts the barrel nut you referred to seems like it would move the shift lever forward or back horizontally. #15 on the chart is where the whole assembly rests on the spline and might be where you'd have to adjust for up or down---Is that correct?. Seems like where the lever attaches to the shift rod there should also be a spline so you could rotate it a notch at a time up or down.



OEM Parts Catalog

Kenny4
Posted By: Selden

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/05/20 01:14 AM

No, the barrel nut moves the shift lever up or down, by changing the distance to the pivot point. A linkage like this provides far finer adjustability than jumping a notch on the spline. My 2014 F700GS has the latter, and I wish it had an adjustable linkage like the XT225.
Posted By: Kenny4

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/05/20 04:04 AM

Well then Muniac was right, but I got confused looking at the parts catalog's sketching of it. Selden thanks for chiming in to confirm that.

Kenny4
Posted By: Muniac

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/05/20 03:19 PM

No problems as those diagrams aren't always clear with details. That barrel nut is exactly like a turnbuckle with left and right threads plus locks nuts. Just make sure the threads are synced and enough remains in the female portions to provide strength. Ride safely.
Posted By: JerryH

Re: DMO Specialties - 07/30/20 02:59 PM

I now wear thick sole leather work boots for riding. They also have non slip soles. I needed to raise the shift lever a little. I moved it one spline on the shift shaft. If you use the turnbuckle linkage to adjust the shift lever, it changes the distance between the lever pivot point and the shift shaft, which can cause shifting problems. The angles between the end of the rod, the vertical part that attaches to the shift shaft, and the vertical part of the shift lever should be exactly 90 degrees. Lengthening or shortening the rod will change that angle.
Posted By: Woods Walker

Re: DMO Specialties - 09/11/20 12:13 AM

Originally Posted by JerryH
I now wear thick sole leather work boots for riding. They also have non slip soles. I needed to raise the shift lever a little. I moved it one spline on the shift shaft. If you use the turnbuckle linkage to adjust the shift lever, it changes the distance between the lever pivot point and the shift shaft, which can cause shifting problems. The angles between the end of the rod, the vertical part that attaches to the shift shaft, and the vertical part of the shift lever should be exactly 90 degrees. Lengthening or shortening the rod will change that angle.


Hi Jerry !
I just ordered the DMO Foot Pegs also and will be adjusting the shift level higher since I don't like the low position of it anyway. When I blew up pictures on the net of stock XT225's it did indeed look like the linkage's were 90 Deg. to the shaft as mine is. So my question was .....do I use the the turnbuckle/ barrel nut ( Muniac) or the spline on the shifter (Your advice). Instead of starting an argument about how many teeth are in a horses mouth.....I decided to go look and see for myself while taking some measurements. What I found surprised me !

I just got my 2005 XT225 with 1600 miles on it about 2 weeks ago. It appears , so far, to be all stock. My shift linkages are both 90 degrees to the shift shaft(as you say should be) and the shift foot lever appears to be level or parallel to the ground. The problem with this is... that the rubber part used to shift with my foot is 1 1/4" below my foot peg. The turnbuckle/barrel nut is adjusted all the way in meaning that my shift lever is at it's lowest possible position. The up shift movement is aprox. 7/8" and the down shift movement aprox. 3/4"

The first thing I did was move the spline 1 tooth clockwise. That in turn moved both shift linkages 11 1/4 degrees (360 degrees / 32 splines = 11.25 Degrees) from perpendicular to the shift shaft and raised the foot shifter 7/8". My up shift movement was 7/8" and my down shift movement was 13/16" (I was only eyeballing with a tape rule so basically the same as stock) Still it was 3/8 " below my foot peg in it's untouched position ! I wouldn't want to move it another spline tooth because the further away from perpendicular to the shift shaft the transmission lever gets the less the mechanical advantage.

Next I moved the splined lever back to it's vertical position (where it was) and adjusted the turnbuckle/barrel nut as far out as I could while maintaining what I thought would be a decent amount of thread engagement. HERE IS WHERE IT GETS INTERESTING.... That moved the shift lever up 1 7/8". Now my shift lever was 5/8" ABOVE my foot peg. Another interesting thing I hadn't thought of is that the lever comming out of the transmission obviously stayed vertical and at approximately 90 degrees to the shift shaft. (although mathematically the shaft angle must change the amount is negligible) Only the linkage opposite the transmission lever changed its angle from the 90 Degree position by about 24 Degrees. (if 7/8"=11.25 degrees then 1 7/8" = 24.1 Degrees)
I would prefer this method of adjustment if it's enough to satisfy. The only trade off is the movement to up shift increases about 1/8" and the movement to down shift increases by about 1/6". Negligible in my book :-)

At this point I left the turnbuckle set to max and moved the transmission lever 1 spline tooth CW as before and as expected it moved the foot shift lever up another 7/8" as before. This raised the foot shifter to 1 1/2" above the foot peg. I don't think I would want to move more than 1 spine tooth at the trans shift lever because rotational forces are starting to convert to linear forces. To see this yourself....rotate the transmission lever to the horizontal position (90 Degrees) and you see all the rotational force has been converted leaving NO rotational force possible with the shift shaft.

NOTE: All the measurements were taken quickly by eyeballing with a tape rule but I think close enough to answer some questions.

THE TAKE AWAY FOR ME: If I need to raise the foot shift lever 1 7/8" or less, I'll just use the turnbuckle/barrel nut as Scott suggested. If I need to move it more then 1 7/8" then obviously I would need to move the transmission lever 1 spline tooth plus use the turnbuckle/barrel nut to get what I need and try it out.

Hope this helps !
Posted By: Muniac

Re: DMO Specialties - 09/11/20 08:45 PM

Adjusting via a spline tooth is fine with the cautions about lever arm you point out. The only words of caution about the turn buckle adjustment is make sure you have enough threads engaged for strength. It's also a good idea to sync the left and right threads so they run in/out equally.

As for shifting technique, it's the up shifting that requires getting under the lever. I always used the soul top of my motocross boot to pull up on the shifter. Enough of it stuck out beyond the boot to catch the lever. You'll not want that lever to interfere with ground clearance. Another word of caution is to avoid an accidental downshift whilst standing on the pegs. The can happen if your boot hovers over the shift lever (set too high) and the bike's frame comes up. Your balance instincts are to try to remain vertical. That can cause your boot toe to downshift. Which can throw you forward abruptly. This can happen climbing hills and/or going up and over rocks.

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]
Finishing off a sweep at Peach Valley - Olathe, CO

If you're riding steep stuff, which I usually did in 2nd gear it's easy to accidentally shift into neutral. The photo above shows the rear kicking out dirt. Barely enough traction to make the top. If you hit neutral you're done. You'll never get back into gear quick enough. This is one place I wish the bike had a few more CCs. Some of the hills in this area required 400 CCs and a paddle tire. We always picked what was within the bike and rider limitations. It's a soft fall in this terrain but a PITA getting the bike back on its feet.

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]
Doing horseshoes in Peach Valley - Olathe, CO

The above is a lot steeper than it looks. The bike didn't have enough power to hit the top. So you do horseshoes, cresting with just enough speed to make the turn back down. The terrain here is uneven, so you can only enter so fast. The DMO pegs are a nice enhancement to the bike. Ride safely and enjoy.
Posted By: Woods Walker

Re: DMO Specialties - 09/12/20 03:08 PM

Originally Posted by Muniac
Adjusting via a spline tooth is fine with the cautions about lever arm you point out. The only words of caution about the turn buckle adjustment is make sure you have enough threads engaged for strength. It's also a good idea to sync the left and right threads so they run in/out equally.

As for shifting technique, it's the up shifting that requires getting under the lever. I always used the soul top of my motocross boot to pull up on the shifter. Enough of it stuck out beyond the boot to catch the lever. You'll not want that lever to interfere with ground clearance. Another word of caution is to avoid an accidental downshift whilst standing on the pegs. The can happen if your boot hovers over the shift lever (set too high) and the bike's frame comes up. Your balance instincts are to try to remain vertical. That can cause your boot toe to downshift. Which can throw you forward abruptly. This can happen climbing hills and/or going up and over rocks.

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]
Finishing off a sweep at Peach Valley - Olathe, CO

If you're riding steep stuff, which I usually did in 2nd gear it's easy to accidentally shift into neutral. The photo above shows the rear kicking out dirt. Barely enough traction to make the top. If you hit neutral you're done. You'll never get back into gear quick enough. This is one place I wish the bike had a few more CCs. Some of the hills in this area required 400 CCs and a paddle tire. We always picked what was within the bike and rider limitations. It's a soft fall in this terrain but a PITA getting the bike back on its feet.

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]
Doing horseshoes in Peach Valley - Olathe, CO

The above is a lot steeper than it looks. The bike didn't have enough power to hit the top. So you do horseshoes, cresting with just enough speed to make the turn back down. The terrain here is uneven, so you can only enter so fast. The DMO pegs are a nice enhancement to the bike. Ride safely and enjoy.


As a long time Machinist I have a pretty good gut feeling when it comes to thread strength but that's no substitute for some basic calculations. So I went out and checked that "feeling " of enough thread left and found I had less than I thought. I had about 7/32 of actual thread engagement, discounting the thread lead. It appears to be a 6mm screw which is slightly bigger than a #10-24 screw so I used the approximate tensile strength of a mild steel #10-24 screw for a conservative calculation. A rule of thumb I've used over the years is 1 1/2 times the diameter (min.) of thread engagement for max strength. When I used those figures at a 3 1/2 to 1 lever ratio that the XT has I figured it should be able to conservatively withstand 150 lbs. up shift force and much more on the down shift because of the lock nuts. So a 300 lb. man accidentally standing on the shifter with half his weight. (the other half being on the opposite peg) should be no problem with even that small amount of thread engagement. And just try to exert 150 lbs. on the up shift....or 100 lbs. for that matter !

Thank you for the "heads up" on the problem with a high shifter. Once again your knowledge saves time with trial and error ! That 7/32 thread engagement put the shift lever 5/8" ABOVE the foot peg so don't want to go that far after your advise.

I sure CAN see how crazy steep those hills are in your pics. I wouldn't have thought the XT could make it as far as you did. I'm sure rider skill had something to do with it. Can see where those DMO pegs are important and expect them to be the "Bees Knees" compared to the tiny stock ones. Once again.....thank you Scott for taking the time to give these pointers along with your pics that prove you know what you are talking about !
Posted By: Woods Walker

Re: DMO Specialties - 09/12/20 05:13 PM

I know this might not be the thread to ask about safety gear and which brand/types that people like so wondering if you could start a thread about safety gear or point me to one if has already been hashed over. Since things are constantly changing......perhaps a new topic about that could be warranted. What do you think ?
Posted By: peejman

Re: DMO Specialties - 09/12/20 05:38 PM

Originally Posted by Woods Walker
I know this might not be the thread to ask about safety gear and which brand/types that people like so wondering if you could start a thread about safety gear or point me to one if has already been hashed over. Since things are constantly changing......perhaps a new topic about that could be warranted. What do you think ?


Feel free to start a new thread on that topic, or any other topic you like.
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